Lesson 5: Roman Art

Your Course:

  • 40 Lessons for only $ 69,50

  • No registration fee

  • Video lessons by 40 AI instructors

  • 24/7 support by Jacky, your AI assistant

  • High-quality texts and thousands of images

  • Study at your own pace

  • The best price for the highest quality

  • Start within a few minutes

What You Will Learn:

  • Explore All Art Movements and Periods

    You will learn about all the leading art movements and periods, such as primitive art, ancient Greek art, the Renaissance, Romanticism, Impressionism, Modernism, and contemporary art. There is also a lot of attention to non-Western art, such as Islamic Art, Hindu Art, Chinese Art, Oceanic Art and African Art, and the globalization of the art world.

  • All Famous Artists and Their Masterpieces

    The course covers important artists like Sultan Muhammad, Fan Kuan, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Utagawa Hiroshige, Vincent van Gogh, Ilya Repin, Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall, Frida Kahlo, Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, Banksy and many more, and discusses their most influential works.

  • Cultural and Historical Context

    Our courses also focus on the study of the cultural, social, political, and economic contexts in which artworks are created.

  • Various Media and Techniques

    You will explore different art forms and techniques, such as painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, and digital art.

Introduction to this course:

 

Without a doubt, the influence of the ancient Greeks was enormous on the development of Roman art from the birth of Christ to 400 AD, although we should not underestimate Etruscan influences either. Roman religion and gladiator games, for example, had their roots in Etruscan civilization. Until 510 BC, there was even an Etruscan king at the head of the city of Rome. It was primarily the Etruscans who introduced Greek art into Roman society. The Romans copied much of this Greek art, including bronze statues, but they used marble as the material. Greek slaves laid mosaic floors in Roman villas, the Romans honored Greek and Etruscan gods as their own, even though they translated the names of the gods into Latin, and Greek architectural styles formed the foundation on which the Romans further built.
Ultimately, the Etruscan city-states were defeated by the Roman armies, bringing an end to Etruscan culture. Subsequently, the populations of the Etruscans and Romans mixed, as did their knowledge, skills, and experiences.
The Romans had uniform ideas about beauty, striving to achieve an ideal appearance for almost every object. This idealization of reality is reflected in Roman art, much like what was seen in ancient Greek art.

An Etruscan balsamarium, a bronze perfume container, shaped in the form of the god of love and fertility. The Etruscans called these gods Lasas. The lid features two rings by which it was suspended.
Location: This balsamarium is located in the Walters Art Museum. You can find this art museum at 600 N. Charles Street in downtown Baltimore, Maryland.
Image: An Etruscan balsamarium, a bronze perfume container, shaped in the form of the god of love and fertility. The Etruscans called these gods Lasas. The lid features two rings by which it was suspended.
Location: This balsamarium is located in the Walters Art Museum. You can find this art museum at 600 N. Charles Street in downtown Baltimore, Maryland.

The Etruscans and their Art

Etruscan art is not discussed here as a separate art movement. The reason is that the Etruscans lived in the area that now includes Tuscany and parts of Umbria and Latium on the Italian Peninsula. This area was known in the distant past as Etruria. The Etruscans, also called Etrurians, serve as “the cultural forefathers” of the Romans in art history. That’s why I’m discussing them under the heading of Roman art.
The origins of the Etruscans are uncertain, but many historians believe they originally came from Anatolia, located in present-day Turkey. However, they were primarily influenced in terms of art and culture by the ancient Greeks, particularly from around 625 BC onwards. The wealthier Etruscans imported many Greek art objects during this time. Subsequently, the ancient Greek arts became known to the Romans through the Etruscans, and in this sense, the Etruscans played a pivotal role in the history of Roman art. What was unique about this society was that women and men were treated equally and had equal status, although historical records show that it was mainly men who held the most important positions in the Etruscan city-states. The twelve city-states in Etruria formed a confederation that primarily collaborated in religious and military matters, rarely engaging in wars with each other.
Etruscan temples, in terms of architecture, resembled Greek temples from similar periods. It’s not surprising that, starting from 600 BC, they adopted the same divisions of periods as the ancient Greeks: the Archaic period (from 600 BC to 480 BC), the Classical period (from 480 BC to 320 BC), and the Hellenistic period (from 323 BC to around 100 BC). However, they were about fifty years behind the Greeks.
Not much has survived from the Etruscans, mainly because they built their temples from perishable materials, with the exception of the stone foundations on which these religious buildings stood. Even the cities were constructed from perishable materials, with bricks used only occasionally, as can be seen in Marzabotto, in the vicinity of Bologna.
The Etruscans introduced the vault and the arch into architecture, knowledge, skills, and experiences that the Romans would later build upon. Most of the Etruscan art objects that currently enrich the halls of our museums were found in burial chambers.

Etruskisch deksel van terracotta asurn, 2de eeuw voor Christus, British Museum, Londen
Image: An Etruscan lid of an urn made of pottery from the 2nd century BC. What stands out is that the image is more realistic than in Greek art. It depicts the subject as they are in reality, without idealizing them. The Etruscans were often portrayed in a relaxed manner and reclining on their urns and sarcophagi.
Location: This lid of an urn from a burial chamber is located in the British Museum. The museum is situated on Great Russell Street in the British capital, London.

error: Content is protected !!

This website uses cookies to ensure that you get the best experience on our website.